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Artyom Savelyev & Adoption . . .

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Earlier this month, an adopted boy was placed on a plane bound for Russia.  In his pocket was a note from his American "mother" that explained she was not willing to take care of him anymore and announced that she relinquished her parental responsibilities.  There has been a lot of coverage on this topic: the Russian government threatening to halt any adoptions out of the country; the U.S. government pleading to avoid a halt; the U.S. blaming the Russian adoption system; Russia blaming the U.S.; new information about many other Russian adoptees being mistreated or killed in the U.S. (click here for more info).  

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Adoption is an ambitious journey for those (child and parents) who are involved and especially difficult when individuals/couples are not prepared --- have not thought out all the various aspects of transracial adoption.  Dr. John Raible, an expert on transracial adoption and a professor at The University of Nebraska-Lincoln writes and teaches on this subject. John has really helped me think about the many-layered aspects to adoption.  If one seeks to adopt a child from another race, another country--how willing is that parent going to be in immersing herself/himself within that child's racial and ethnic heritage?  If the adopted child is Black or Asian and the family is white, how willing is that family to move to a Black or Asian neighborhood so that the parents are forced to work through the discomfort of being the minority rather than the child.  These are just two of many questions Dr. Raible raises with individuals/couples who are seeking to adopt.  

I invite you to read John's blog (click here!).  It's so important to think through all the complexities involved in transracial adoption.  I am thinking of little Artyom Savelyev and thinking about all other adopted children who fear that any minute, they may be placed on a plane, taken away, abandoned all over again.  



 

 

 
 
 
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